Purim Thoughts

Wrote this a couple of years ago as a Facebook status. I still like it.

People don’t understand something:
The megillah does not have a happy ending.
The Jews have evaded one genocide attempt, but what makes them any less vulnerable if another Haman arises to try again?
The fact that the King is now married to a Jew? Read the beginning of the megillah to find out how permanent that position is.
The fact that a Jew is now a trusted adviser to the King? Read the end of the megillah to find out how permanent that position is.
Esther is trapped in a marriage she entered into unwillingly, forced to stay to protect her people, כאשר אבדתי, אבדתי.
It’s far from a happy ending.

Most Jewish holidays are about miracles, moments of transcendence in our physical world, a brief light in the darkness and confusion.
Purim is different. On Purim we are involved in the physical. We eat and we drink and we take care of each other’s physical needs and wants.
On Purim we are confused. We put on masks, we drink. On Purim we don’t try to find the light in the darkness.
On Purim we wring the light out of the darkness itself.

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